Fairy Godmothers and Wicked Witches

judesoph10_10_12-1211

I was in good company last week. I was watching the grandkids so my daughter could work on illustrations for a children's book. So there were cartoons. Lots of cartoons. Since cartoons, like any media, are not created equal, I needed a break. I needed one of those cartoons that kids and adults could stand, I mean, watch.

Enter Sleeping Beauty. A Disney classic that I saw countless times when my kids were small, particularly when my youngest child, John, identified so much with Prince Philip that he carried a makeshift sword of truth and shield of virtue and defended fair maidens (his big sister was granted an aura of royalty that her other two brothers had failed to detect).

This time around I was watching with an eye as to how the story played out not only classic hero journey motifs, but motifs that fall under the category of Catholic fiction.

What is Catholic fiction as distinguished from other fiction?

Well, that's a longer answer than will fit here, but for the purposes of classic tales, there is the element of hope, there is virtue--light-- that can conquer darkness. Yes, there is struggle, there needs to be struggle or there is no story worth telling, but struggle aided by prayer and divine intervention, aka, the fairy godmothers.

The magnificent villain Maleficent-- what a name!!-- whom everyone is obsequious to and dare not provoke-- wields her terror from the christening of the fair child until the hero, filled with the courage that only love can generate, aided by his angels, risks his all to battle through the dark forest to save his love.

I know that all these 'fairy tales' have been derided over the past generation as being too sweet, too perfect, too ridiculous, to be a paradigm for children. But what have we lost in dismissing these stories? What have we lost in dismissing fairy godmothers and hope that goes beyond our limited human resources?

If we accept the metaphor of fairy godmothers standing in for angels, then they are anything but sweet. Angels are ferocious. Think of all the images in our collective imaginations of Archangel Michael slaying Lucifer.

I wonder if there is a correlation to the trend of making 'realistic' heroes for children, heroes who rely only on their own wits and strengths, and the preponderance of angel stories bursting through the fringes of our culture?